The Victim Gene & The Hero Complex

When humans lived as nomads, or in tribes and even in clans, the pressures for survival came largely from the environment and other neighboring rivals.  Most perfections that currently inhabit the human frame emerged out of these pressures.  But ever since humans transitioned into feudalistic and more limiting societal structures, the pressures of rivals and environment were largely diminished. Instead, the pressures for survival came mostly from artificially constructed social structures defined by politicians and clergymen. Consequently, now, many thousands of years later, humans have been selected out for optimal use by such leaders.

Now, in the 21st century, a large contingency of humans exists that have been selected out by a system of laws under the oversight of rulers.  These laws have multiplied and have been scattered among the populace as tools by which to protect themselves but often to be used as weapons with aggressive intent to destroy a neighbor, a family member or a business rival.  This system has put in place rewards and punishments that have given incentive to use these laws.  This system has taken center stage in nations that derived their legal system from British-common-law.

Through these environmental pressures, some races (in particular the white-Caucasian race and all those mixed with them) have exposed a genetic predisposition to feeling oppressed. A hypersensitivity to wrong-doing for themselves and on behalf of others.  While the tendency may have had a proper use in early stages of development for the Nation-State, now that most threats have been abated, the ludicrousness of this new human feature (the victim-gene) has never been so nakedly exposed.  These humans, now, spend much mental energy seeking out reason to feel oppressed or to champion others.   If only they knew, this tendency was genetically selected by their newest rulers, like a bloodhound bread for its keen sense of smell.

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